Manuscript and bound collections

 

 

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The Agrarian is an official student publication of the Clemson University College of Agriculture and Biological Sciences. Starting in December 1938, this college-wide publication focused on all aspects of agriculture with a main audience of agricultural leaders – county agents, specialists, agricultural teachers and instructors and leading farmers. It was published semiannually until the Spring/Summer of 1965.

 

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Minutes and reports of Clemson University’s Board of Trustees from 1888 to the present.

Since its beginnings in 1888, the Clemson University Board of Trustees is the main governing body for the university. As defined in Thomas Green Clemson’s will, the Board of Trustees consists of seven Trustees who select their successors and six Trustees who are appointed by the State Legislature. The Board’s main responsibility is to govern through establishment of policies that ensure academic quality and freedom, protect the University’s financial security, and ensure efficient and effective administration through the Board’s selected president and its executive officers.

 

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The Bobbin and Beaker was an official student publication of the Clemson School of Industrial Management and Textile Science. Organized in November 1939 by Iota Chapter of Phi Psi Fraternity for the Clemson Textile School, the first issue of this semiannual publication arrived in March 1940 for the students, textile school graduates, and the textile industry. The publication was suspended in April 1943 for the duration of the war. It resumed publishing on January 1947 with a change to four issues annually during the school year. Due to a lack of student participation and a changing industry, it ceased publication with the Winter/Spring Issue 1966.

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Undergraduate Announcements and course descriptions for Clemson University.

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The Clemson Chronicle is the University’s student run literary arts magazine, featuring prose, poetry, art, and photography.

 

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The Clemson College Class of 1939 is a unique class. After graduation, not only did almost all of its members serve in World War II (with 26 making the ultimate sacrifice), but they also made a series of commitments to the University at their 50th Golden Anniversary Reunion in 1989 that have both served to sustain the class into perpetuity and to enhance the Clemson experience as a whole. The class contributes to student scholarships, has endowed a Faculty Award for Excellence, and supports projects in the Heritage Gardens, part of the Clemson Botanical Garden. Membership to the class increases each year with the induction of the Faculty Award for Excellence winners as well as the induction of other members who support the class. A Leadership Committee has been established for the honorary members to work with the remaining class members to perpetuate the memory, ideals, and goals of the original members of the Great Class of ’39.

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Clemson University Graduation Commencement Programs.

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Graduate School announcements and course descriptions for Clemson University.

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The Clemson Newsletters contain information for the faculty and staff of the University.

 

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View fully scanned football programs

The Clemson University Football Program Cover Collection comes from the University Archives, and features 198 unique cover layouts of both home and away games. Typical of sports programs, these covers are the combined efforts of illustrators, graphic artists and printers that worked with the University Athletic Department to create these souvenirs, which contained biographical information on coaches and athletes, as well as statistical information about each team. While most programs in this collection are from home games, there are also some programs from away games and bowl games.

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The Clemson annual yearbooks have been a tradition since 1899, when the first issue was published as the Clemson College Chronicle.

Since 1899, the yearbook has had several names:

Clemson College Chronicle (1899-1900)
The Clemsonian (1901)
Clemson College Chronicle (1902)
The Oconeean (1903-1904)
The Chronicle (1905)
Clemson College Annual (1906-1907)

In 1908, Taps became the name of the annual yearbook and has carried on the tradition of documenting the Clemson campus and student life.

 

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With a public service career spanning over 70 years, the speeches of Senator Strom Thurmond document the evolution of his thoughts, opinions, and philosophies in all of the public offices he held – State Senator, Circuit Judge, Governor, and U.S. Senator. His words are reflective of the times and of his unflagging support of his constituents. These speeches available online are only a small portion of the Strom Thurmond Collection.

 

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The Tiger is the student-run newspaper for Clemson University and its community. First produced on January 21, 1907, it is the oldest collegiate newspaper in the state of South Carolina. The weekly, national award-winning publication is distributed every Tuesday and Thursday on and off campus with a circulation of approximately 12,000.

 

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Thomas Green Clemson demonstrated the versatility which gifted people often possess in his varied activities as a mining engineer, government official, plantation owner, scientist, proponent of higher education, artist and art collector, and supporter of scientific farming. Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Clemson adopted South Carolina as his home after marrying Anna Maria Calhoun, the oldest daughter of the South Carolina statesman John C. Calhoun. Little is known of Clemson’s early life other than that his father was a well-to-do merchant in Philadelphia. Clemson attended public schools in Philadelphia and the American Literary, Scientific and Military Academy in Norwich, Vermont.

The papers of Thomas G. Clemson were kept after his death by his attorney, Richard W. Simpson. Following Simpson’s death, his daughter, Maria Louise, took possession of the Clemson papers. In 1915 or 1916 Miss Simpson turned the papers over to her brother-in-law, Professor Alester G. Holmes, who recognized their historical importance and the need to have them properly cared for. In 1947, Maria Louise Simpson formally donated the papers to Clemson University. Information regarding the provenance of the Clemson Papers can be found in Box 7, Folder 5 of this collection and in the Alester G. Holmes Collection, Mss 1, Box 1, Folder 3, 1930- 1935. In 2000 photocopies of Clemson family correspondence to Elias Baker, Clemson’s uncle, were obtained from the Blair County (PA) Historical Society in exchange for copies of the Baker correspondence in the collection. The collection also includes accessions 93-25, 03-97, 06-40 and 06-45.

Clemson Papers are closely related to the John C. Calhoun Papers (Mss 200), the Richard K. Cralle Papers (Mss 109), the Holmes Collection and the Richard W. Simpson Papers (Mss 96). There are no restrictions on the use of this collection beyond those of Special Collections.